Have a picky eater on your hands? Read the tips below !

Nutrition Notes: What to do when you have a picky eater at home

by Ana de Castro, Dietetic Intern

While having a picky child may be stressful, it is (in most cases) a normal part of development. Disliking a new fruit or vegetable the first time they try it is a very normal reaction. As long as their refusal doesn’t involve all foods, it’s generally not a problem.

In this case, persistence counts. In order to feel comfortable eating something, the child often has to become familiar with it. So make sure the food is visible by having it on the table and available to them. If many attempts have been made to introduce a food to the child and they continually reject it, consider taking it off the table and reintroducing it in about a month’s time.

Tips for Parents of Picky Eaters. Getting your child to try new foods can often feel like a chore, but you can make this challenge easier by using the following strategies:

1. Don’t become a short order cook. If your child is refusing to eat certain foods, you may be tempted to provide a separate meal. However, giving your child too many options for meals might only complicate things. If they know you’ll make them something else they already like, they won’t take the opportunity to try new foods.

2. Make mealtime a sit-down event. When kids are constantly eating on the go, they get used to fast-food items and other foods that can be easily taken on the road. These typically do not include a variety of fruits and vegetables. Plus, getting kids used to eating meals at the table gives them the opportunity to try new foods.

3. Plan your snacks. Allowing kids to graze all day long might cause them to not be hungry when it comes time for dinner and not be willing to try new foods. Separate snacks from meals and make snack time a planned, sit-down event. And there should be at least an hour or two between a snack and a meal to allow time for the child to become hungry again.

4. Don’t make a big issue of it. Besides raising your own stress level, making a big fuss over a picky eater can be pointless. If a child realizes that refusing food gets them a lot of attention, they might keep doing it, especially at a younger age.

5. Make it fun. Consider making it ‘Yellow Day,’ when you and the kids have to wear something yellow and also pick out a yellow fruit or vegetable to eat. Involving the kids in choosing the foods, and maybe even helping to cook them, can also spark their interest and is another way to build familiarity with a new food.

6. Hide the ingredients. You can easily get your kids to eat more fruits and vegetables by hiding them in foods they already enjoy. While it’s a great way to get kids to fulfill their daily servings, it’s important to recognize that this should not be your only approach to encouraging healthy eating. Kids need to acquire a taste for fruits and vegetables alone, so that they don’t grow up avoiding them.

Nutrition is a reason to smile all month long!

Nutrition Notes: March is National Nutrition Month!

by Nicole Hartig, Dietetic Intern

National Nutrition Month has a long history beginning in 1980 when Congress decided to expand National Nutrition Week to encompass the entire month of March. The purpose of the month is to spread nutrition information and education to the community by promoting sound eating practices and physical activity habits.

National Nutrition Month is sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), who works to bring awareness to this health and nutrition-focused campaign. AND is a great resource for healthy eating tips, ways to eat right on a budget and fun worksheets and games for kids to catch the healthy eating bug. You can learn more about National Nutrition Month as a whole by visiting www.nationalnutritionmonth.org. How can you celebrate National Nutrition Month? Check your local hospitals, food banks, community organizations and schools for special programs and educational classes taught by registered dietitians (RDs).

Can’t find any classes in your area? Try these simple ideas to jump start your healthy lifestyle:

- Explore new foods by cooking one new healthy dish for your family every week of March. Visit eatfresh.org for nutritious recipes.

- Visit a farmer’s market and select a fruit or vegetable that is new to you. Find your local farmers market by visiting the San Diego Farm Bureau’s website.

- Learn how to read a food label by visiting the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website, and practice your new skills on your next grocery shopping trip.

- Be active! Commit to taking a walk in your neighborhood after dinner each night.

- Reduce your chances of getting sick by practicing proper food safety guidelines. Learn about them here.

Need a little boost to start your new healthy habits? Consult with a local registered dietitian to learn easy-to-follow nutrition advice and reduce your risk of chronic disease. If you know a dietitian, make sure to give them a shout-out on March 11th, because it is Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day! You can also learn more about dietitians at www.eatright.org/RD.

Healthy snacks... yes, there is such a thing!

Nutrition Notes: Snacking with a purpose

by Edgar Calderon, Nutrition Intern

All parents understand that it is important to provide healthy snacks to children, but did you know most kids get over a quarter of their daily calories from snacking? A 2010 study reported that sixty percent of children skip a meal, typically breakfast. Often the caloric deficiency is made up through snacking. These recent studies and surveys have made it more clear how much of an impact snacking choices have on a child’s development. Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to get kids to make smart snacking choices when typically the decision process does not include the parents.

Below are a few tips that will help encourage kids to make smarter decisions when they visit the fridge and/or pantry.

Give kids what they love. Try to incorporate their favorite foods into their snack, even if this means cookies. A single crushed up cookie will go a long way in a healthy trail mix of nuts and dried fruit.

You can wrap everything. Try a savory hummus and shredded carrot wrap or if they are craving something sweet, get out their favorite nut butter and fruit. Your wrapping options are only confined to your creativity!

Make your own dips. Most store-bought dips can be unhealthy. Making your own can be easier than it sounds, and it gives you and your family the ability to customize to your specific tastes. Make an easy tasty dip for veggies using taco seasoning and low-fat plain yogurt.

Use simple recipes. Using simple recipes allows for (older) kids to be more involved in the food preparation process. Try new recipes with them or try to create a healthy spin on a family favorite. They will be proud of their recipes and be excited to share with friends.

Looking for a few fun new snack ideas? Check out a few of these resources for ideas:

Super Healthy Kid Snacks
The 20 Best Snacks for Kids
10 Snack Tips for Parents

Granola is a great snack, if you know how to do it the healthy way!

Nutrition Notes: How to become a DIY granola guru

Jenna Olson, RD and Nutrition & Wellness Educator

Granola is known as a breakfast favorite around the world. Some people view granola as a power-packed health food, while others think it is chalked full of unnecessary calories. Store-bought granola can be expensive, but the great news is you can make your own and it is usually less expensive!

Granola is a fun and super simple healthy option that can be prepared right at home! By making granola at home, the potential for mystery ingredients is removed, which makes it easier to forgo the possibly not-so healthy ingredient options. A basic granola recipe generally includes oats, sweetener, oil and some add-in options. Those options may include nuts, dried fruit, seeds or dried coconut shavings. Some recipes may even call for an extra protein punch from peanut butter or other nut butter such as almond butter. Since granola is packed with nutritionally dense ingredients, it is important to be conscious of portion sizes! The average serving size for granola is about 1/4 cup (about the size of one large egg) and ranges from 100-150 calories per serving depending on the ingredients chosen.

Granola recipe ideas are endless! Follow the steps below, and get creative in the kitchen with a recipe that suits your style and taste buds.

Main Ingredients

1. Grains: 3 cups
Most recipes include rolled oats but feel free to add in a couple tablespoons of quinoa for extra protein.

2. Nuts: 1-1 ½ cups
Choose a favorite nut or go for a mix some favorites include almonds, pistachios, walnuts or pecans.

3. Sweetener: 1/2 – 3/4 cup
A liquid sweetener helps bind the granola together by coating the mixture evenly. Try using maple syrup, honey, agave or brown rice syrup.

4. Oil: 1/4 – 1/2 cup
This is the crunch factor. The sweetener is in charge of binding whereas the oil keeps the granola from becoming one big sticky glob. Oils including olive oil, coconut oil, canola or grapeseed oil will do the trick.

5. Salt: Just a pinch
Salt always goes a long way so make sure to not over do it here!

Potential Add-In Ingredients

6. Seeds: 1-2 cups
These may include pumpkin, sunflower or sesame seeds

7. Dried coconut shavings or dried fruit: 1 cup

8. Spices: 1 teaspoon
Try adding sweet and savory spices to the recipe such as cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger.

Directions (How to mix and bake properly)

1. Turn oven on to 300˚F.

2. Place all dry ingredients into a large bowl. Do not add dried fruit or roasted nuts at this stage, if they are a part of the designed recipe.

3. Add oil and sweetener to the bowl of dry ingredients and stir all ingredients together.

4. Spray baking pan with non-stick spray and spread out granola mixture onto baking sheet.

5. Bake at 300 ˚F for 30-45 minutes; make sure to stir granola half way through after about 20 minutes in the oven.

6. Let granola cool completely and store in an airtight container.

Granola is a great addition to many staple snack and meal ideas. Check out a few of the links below for recipes and ideas on how to use it! Happy baking!

Granola: 14 Ways to Use It
Peanut Butter Oatmeal Energy Bites
3 Ingredient No Bake Granola Bars
Grab & Go Granola Bars and Bites

Nutrition Notes: Vitamin D – The Sunshine Vitamin

by Nicole Hartig, Dietetic Intern

Vitamin D is a powerhouse of a vitamin, because it plays an important role in bone strength, our immunity, and cell growth. Adequate levels of vitamin D have also been shown to reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. On the other side, not getting enough vitamin D can cause a loss of bone mass, which can lead to osteoporosis. Getting enough vitamin D through all stages of life is important so that our bones and cells can grow and stay strong.

If vitamin D is so important, where do we get it? The sun! Vitamin D is known as the “Sunshine Vitamin” because our skin absorbs sunlight and turns it into vitamin D. In these cloudy winter months it can be difficult to get the recommended amount, not to mention that too much exposure to sunlight is damaging to our skin. Luckily, there are quite a few food sources that are packed with vitamin D to help increase intake. Only a few foods naturally contain vitamin D, but it is added to many products. Try fish (such as salmon and tuna), mushrooms, eggs, vitamin D fortified milk, orange juice or yogurt, to get your recommended dose of vitamin D.

Click here to read more information on recommended intake and good sources of vitamin D.

Make sure to get outside, and catch some rays, too! Enjoying the outdoors doesn’t require a lot of money. Check out this list of 25 FREE things to do in San Diego for a few ideas!

Nutrition Notes: Freshen Up on Produce Storage Rules

by Jenna Olson, RD Nutrition and Wellness Educator

How often have you opened the fridge to find spoiled produce or a funky odor that leads to the discovery of food products that have been forgotten? According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, the average American wastes 20% of the vegetables and 15% of the fruit purchased in and out of the home. Most of the time produce is discarded because it has gone bad before we are able to use it. In order to maximize the shelf-life of produce items, it is important that these items are stored properly.

Many fruits and vegetables should be stored only at room temperature because refrigerator temperatures can damage them or prevent them from ripening properly. For example, when tomatoes are stored in the fridge, they can lose their flavor and will not fully ripen. So, what should be stored where? Click here to view a chart that can answer all of your storage questions. This chart is a good option for printing and placing on your fridge as a daily reminder.

Freshen up your 2015 with water!

Nutrition Notes: Kick up the water intake a notch this year!

by Jenna Olson, RD Nutrition & Wellness Educator

The new year is in full swing, and of course, with the new year, many people are on journeys to start new habits or kick old ones to the curb to make room for your best year, yet!

Many of us know that it is very important to drink plenty of water each and every day, but there always seems to be an excuse or two as to why many of us never reach the recommended daily amount. This year, try to start off on the right foot and make staying hydrated a priority. Although, recommended water consumption differs for each individual, the average healthy adult should aim to drink about 10-13 cups of water each day.

Not sure how to get that many cups of water into your daily routine? Try adding citrus or fresh fruit to create your own spa water. Citrus water gives plain water some extra flavor, and also provides a few additional health benefits. Water flavored with citrus provides extra vitamin C, aids in digestion, freshens your breath and can help cleanse your systems by helping to flush out excess toxins in your body. Enjoy a few new spa water recipes to try out in 2015, maybe you will find a new favorite. Better yet, do you have any favorite ways to spice up your daily water intake? Or if you have other healthy New Year’s resolutions, please share them with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram!

Nutrition Notes: Survive the Holidays Without the Weight Gain

by Jenna Olson, RD, Nutrition & Wellness Educator

Holiday waistlines have a habit of growing in size over the cooler months. The season of weight gain generally starts with Halloween, followed by Thanksgiving feasts and continues through the December holidays to New Year’s. According to the National Institute of Health, the average American gains about one to two pounds of weight during the holidays. Although this may not seem like a lot, this weight gain builds up after a couple of years. So this year, try to incorporate a few of these tips to help you enjoy some of your holiday favorites without sabotaging your waistline.

1. Make sure to stay hydrated. Before heading out to a holiday party, try drinking a full 8-ounce glass of water accompanied by a piece of fresh fruit or a vegetable snack. This way you don’t arrive thirsty or hungry and head straight for the appetizer table.

2. Switch up your favorites. If you can’t live without gravy on your mashed potatoes or a slice of pumpkin cheesecake, try substituting ingredients during the cooking process to decrease the calorie content.

3. Fill your plate only once. Although holiday gatherings often consist of food and treats, try to only visit the buffet line once. When you are filling up your plate, aim to fill up on fruits and vegetables.

4. Keep moving. Incorporate some sort of exercise into your holiday routines. Consider taking a walk with family or friends to observe neighborhood holiday decorations.

How are you balancing your holiday food fun? Hopefully, a few of these holiday tips can help you feel armed and ready for all of the festivities that come before New Year’s. Sending best wishes to you and yours during the holiday season.

Turkey dinner

Nutrition Notes: Enjoy Thanksgiving Safely

Katie Jones, Dietetic Intern

Gobble, gobble! Thanksgiving is just a few days away! With delicious dishes at the center of many Thanksgiving traditions, food safety is important during this food-filled holiday. Below is a food safety guide related to thawing, cooking and stuffing a turkey, as well as leftovers to help you and your family enjoy a safe and tasty holiday.

Thawing a Turkey: It is not safe to thaw a frozen turkey at room temperature. A turkey can be safely defrosted on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator, submerged in cold water or in a microwave. Allow approximately 24 hours per 4-5 lbs. of turkey to thaw in the refrigerator. Allow 30 minutes per pound of turkey to thaw in cold water. Place turkey in a leak-proof plastic bag, submerge in cold water and change water every 30 minutes until thawed. Follow the manufacturer’s instruction when defrosting a turkey in the microwave.

Cooking a Turkey:
Set the oven to 325°F and cook turkey to a minimum internal temperature of 165°F checking with a food thermometer in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast. Let the turkey stand for 20 minutes before carving. Approximate cooking times are as follows:

  •  8 – 12 lbs. 
    2 ¾ to 3 hrs. (3 to 3 ½ hrs. if stuffed)
  • 12 – 14 lbs. 
    3 to 3 ¾ hrs. (3 ½ to 4 hrs. if stuffed)
  • 14 – 18 lbs.
    3 ¾ to 4 ¼ hrs. (4 to 4 ¼ hrs. if stuffed)
  • 18 – 20 lbs.
    4 ¼ to 4 ½ hrs. (4 ¼ to 4 ¾ hrs. if stuffed)
  • 20 – 24 lbs.
    4 ½ to 5 hrs. (4 ¾ to 5 ¼ hrs. if stuffed)

 
Stuffing a Turkey: For optimal food safety, do not cook the stuffing directly inside the turkey. Instead, cook stuffing separately in a casserole dish. If you do choose to stuff your poultry, be sure to frequently check the temperature with a food thermometer to ensure the temperature stays at 165°F.

Leftovers: Refrigerate cooked leftovers within 2 hours and consume within 3-4 days. Always reheat cooked leftovers to 165°F, checking with a food thermometer, and reheat sauces and gravies to a rolling boil.

This food safety information was derived from http://food.unl.edu/safety/thanksgiving-food-prep. Click on the link for more detailed instructions related to Thanksgiving food preparation and safety.

Looking for a fun Thanksgiving Day activity? Join us for the annual San Diego Run for the Hungry 5k & 10k, and support a good cause while burning a few calories before indulging in your favorite holiday dishes. There are still a few days left to register! Click on the link for more information: http://sdrunforthehungry.org/.

Healthy fats do exist!

Nutrition Notes: The Skinny on Fat

by Katie Jones, Dietetic Intern

It’s time to put an old myth to bed. Eating fat will not make you fat! Consuming an excess amount of any type of calories can lead to weight gain and related health concerns.

Fat is an essential nutrient required for normal body function and is an important part of a healthy diet. Generally, fat should make up 20 to 35% of your total daily calories. However, moderation is key! Fat provides nine calories per gram and small amounts add up quickly. When selecting foods, it is wise to choose foods with healthy fats, limit foods high in saturated fat, and avoid foods with trans fat. All fats are not created equal!

Incorporating healthy fats, such as polyunsaturated, omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats, into your diet can decrease your risk of heart disease and promote heart health, whereas saturated and trans fats can increase your risk of heart disease and negatively affect your health. Foods high in healthy fats include plant-based oils, nuts, seeds and fish. Below are five tips to improve your fat intake and selection.

1. Use liquid plant-based oils for cooking and baking. Plant-based oils, such as olive or canola oil are rich in heart-healthy unsaturated fats.

2. Eliminate trans fat from your diet. Read food labels and choose foods that are trans fat free. Limit fried foods and baked goods that are often high in trans fat.

3. Switch from butter to soft margarine. Butter is high in saturated fat. Choose a product with zero grams of trans fat and no partially-hydrogenated oils in the ingredients list.

4. Eat good sources of omega-3 fatty acid. Include fatty fish (such as salmon or albacore tuna), walnuts, canola oil and flax seeds in your diet regularly.

5. Limit red meat. Beef, pork, and lamb are high in saturated fat, eat these meats in moderation. Opt for leaner protein sources more often such as chicken, fish, beans, and nuts.

What is your recommended daily fat intake? Click on the following link, Health Calculator, for further guidance on your recommended daily fat intake that will match your diet and lifestyle.

Do you have any tasty recipes featuring a healthy fat? Share a picture or idea with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram!

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