Nestor Methodist Church (Image provided by Google Maps)

Nestor Methodist Church selected as April Nonprofit Partner of the Month!

by Shelly Hahne, Nonprofit Services Manager

In the past year, the equivalent of more than 82,000 meals (98,963 pounds of food) have been distributed by this dedicated group of staff and volunteers of Nestor Methodist Church’s food program. Each month they provide nearly 300 households with emergency food, reaching more than 1,300 people facing hunger.

This site provides monthly EFAP packages in the South Bay area. Congratulations to the Nestor Methodist Church team for the amazing work you do!

April is National Gardening Month!

Nutrition Notes: Celebrate National Gardening Month

by Jenna Olson, RD, Nutrition & Wellness Educator

April is National Gardening Month! As the warmer temperatures are upon us, it marks the perfect time to start your very own garden. So what are the benefits of having your own garden?

Nutritious and Tasty Food: Research has shown that home grown foods are usually more nutrient dense and sometimes freshly gardened produce can be tastier than store-bought produce.

Exercise: Gardening is a great rouce of exercise for the body and the mind. It serves as a great stress reliever, and it is a great way to get outside and enjoy some sunshine and fresh air. It also serves as a chance to use your creative side and design how you’d like your garden to look.

Save Money: Growing your own food can make stretching your food budget much easier when you can find your essential fruits and vegetables right in your own backyard!

Teaching Tool: Help educate the little ones in your life by teaching them how fruits and vegetables are grown and and what they look like before they arrive at the local supermarket. A garden serves as a great teaching tool for children to learn where their food comes from.

Balanced Diet: When you have easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables, it makes it that much easier to consume more fruits and vegetables each and every day. You gain more appreciation for the growing process when it occurs in your own backyard.

Never grown your own food before? No problem! Planning My Garden is a great interactive tool that has growing guides on 15 different vegetables. Each growing guide includes where to plant, spacing and depth, special care instructions and most importantly, when to harvest!

If you are interested in trying out your green thumb skills but don’t have the space, you can look into container gardening. Here is a great easy 4-step guide to get your small garden started. Celebrate National Gardening Month this month by starting your own small garden this spring! Happy digging!

Have a picky eater on your hands? Read the tips below !

Nutrition Notes: What to do when you have a picky eater at home

by Ana de Castro, Dietetic Intern

While having a picky child may be stressful, it is (in most cases) a normal part of development. Disliking a new fruit or vegetable the first time they try it is a very normal reaction. As long as their refusal doesn’t involve all foods, it’s generally not a problem.

In this case, persistence counts. In order to feel comfortable eating something, the child often has to become familiar with it. So make sure the food is visible by having it on the table and available to them. If many attempts have been made to introduce a food to the child and they continually reject it, consider taking it off the table and reintroducing it in about a month’s time.

Tips for Parents of Picky Eaters. Getting your child to try new foods can often feel like a chore, but you can make this challenge easier by using the following strategies:

1. Don’t become a short order cook. If your child is refusing to eat certain foods, you may be tempted to provide a separate meal. However, giving your child too many options for meals might only complicate things. If they know you’ll make them something else they already like, they won’t take the opportunity to try new foods.

2. Make mealtime a sit-down event. When kids are constantly eating on the go, they get used to fast-food items and other foods that can be easily taken on the road. These typically do not include a variety of fruits and vegetables. Plus, getting kids used to eating meals at the table gives them the opportunity to try new foods.

3. Plan your snacks. Allowing kids to graze all day long might cause them to not be hungry when it comes time for dinner and not be willing to try new foods. Separate snacks from meals and make snack time a planned, sit-down event. And there should be at least an hour or two between a snack and a meal to allow time for the child to become hungry again.

4. Don’t make a big issue of it. Besides raising your own stress level, making a big fuss over a picky eater can be pointless. If a child realizes that refusing food gets them a lot of attention, they might keep doing it, especially at a younger age.

5. Make it fun. Consider making it ‘Yellow Day,’ when you and the kids have to wear something yellow and also pick out a yellow fruit or vegetable to eat. Involving the kids in choosing the foods, and maybe even helping to cook them, can also spark their interest and is another way to build familiarity with a new food.

6. Hide the ingredients. You can easily get your kids to eat more fruits and vegetables by hiding them in foods they already enjoy. While it’s a great way to get kids to fulfill their daily servings, it’s important to recognize that this should not be your only approach to encouraging healthy eating. Kids need to acquire a taste for fruits and vegetables alone, so that they don’t grow up avoiding them.

The team at the Fallbrook Food Pantry works hard to ensure their community receives the food assistance it needs.

Fallbrook Food Pantry selected as March Nonprofit Partner of the Month!

by Shelly Hahne, Nonprofit Services Manager

In the past year, 381,407 pounds of food (the equivalent of 317,839 meals) were distributed by this dedicated group of staff and volunteers at the Fallbrook Food Pantry. They operate a comprehensive program, utilizing a variety of resources available to them. About 1/3 of the product they distribute is EFAP commodities, 1/3 is fresh produce and another 1/3 is non-perishable food from the San Diego Food Bank’s Food Center. Fallbrook truly has a pulse on the needs of their community and accesses a variety of food sources to meet those needs.

Operations Manager Jennifer Vetch and her team ensure that monthly reports are submitted on time and communicate frequently with Food Bank staff to ensure their community’s needs are met. Because of their impeccable communication, commitment to serve their community and incredible resourcefulness, Fallbrook Food Pantry has been selected a March’s Agency of the Month.

In addition to providing EFAP packages monthly and operating an ongoing food pantry, Fallbrook operates a Neighborhood Distribution on the last Wednesday of each month. Last year, they distributed more than 160,000 pounds of fresh produce to their community. A key focus on nutrition is at the forefront of this program’s services.

Congratulations to the Fallbrook Food Pantry team for the amazing work you do!

Never too late to start composting!

Nutrition Notes: Composting 101

by Courtney Goodwin, Dietetic Intern

With springtime and planting season right around the corner, it is time to start thinking about how we can create a healthy growing environment. Composting does just that! It provides much more nutrient-rich growing soil (ensuring bigger and better plants) while providing a sustainable recycling option for consumers and reducing overall waste.

There are quite a few things that we throw away that could be composted and used to benefit the environment. Just about anything that is not man-made can be composted such as egg shells, coffee grounds, fruit rinds/peels, unused pieces of fruit/vegetables, tea bags, lawn trimmings, nut shells, pits of fruits, stale cereal or grain items, most paper products and much more! These items decompose and break down into a nutrient-rich soil, which is used to help plants grow. Wondering where to start? Follow the steps below and you will have plenty of nutrient-rich soil in no time!

Here’s what you need!

- Carbon-rich “brown” materials such as leaves, straw, dead flowers from your garden and shredded newspaper.

- Nitrogen-rich “green” materials such as grass clippings, plant-based kitchen waste (vegetable peelings and fruit rinds, but no meat scraps), or barnyard animal manure (even though its color is usually brown, manure is full of nitrogen like the other “green” stuff). However, do not use manure from carnivores, such as cats or dogs.

- A shovelful or two of garden soil.

- A site that’s at least 3 feet long by 3 feet wide. Ideally, choose a spot that gets sunlight and shade at different times of the day near a reliable water source.

Here’s what to do!

1. Start by spreading a layer that is several inches thick of dry brown stuff like straw, cornstalks or leaves, where you want to build the pile.

2. Top that with several inches of green stuff.

3. Add a thin layer of soil.

4. Add a layer of brown stuff.

5. Moisten the three layers with water.

Continue layering green stuff and brown stuff with a little soil mixed in until the pile is 3 feet high. Try to add stuff in a ration of three parts brown to one part green. (If it takes a while before you have enough material to build the pile that high, don’t worry. Just keep adding to the pile until it gets to at least3 feet high.) As time goes on, continue adding scraps from the yard/kitchen working to the top of the pile and mist it with water.

You don’t need a compost bin to make compost. You simply need a pile that is at least 3 x 3 x 3 feet. A pile this size will have enough mass to decompose without a bin. Many gardeners buy or build compost bins, because they want to keep the pile neat. Some bins are even designed to make turning the compost easier or protect it from soaking rains. If you choose to not use a bin and have your pile outdoors, consider using a tarp to loosely cover the pile, especially if you live in a very rainy area. This also helps seal in moisture, speeding up the decomposition process.

Starting your own compost pile can be a great activity to get the entire family involved in the growing process. Starting a compost pile is the perfect first step to take in order to create your own backyard garden. Happy growing!

Steps to creating your own compost pile adapted from: Organic Gardening

Other Gardening Resources:

Nutrition is a reason to smile all month long!

Nutrition Notes: March is National Nutrition Month!

by Nicole Hartig, Dietetic Intern

National Nutrition Month has a long history beginning in 1980 when Congress decided to expand National Nutrition Week to encompass the entire month of March. The purpose of the month is to spread nutrition information and education to the community by promoting sound eating practices and physical activity habits.

National Nutrition Month is sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), who works to bring awareness to this health and nutrition-focused campaign. AND is a great resource for healthy eating tips, ways to eat right on a budget and fun worksheets and games for kids to catch the healthy eating bug. You can learn more about National Nutrition Month as a whole by visiting How can you celebrate National Nutrition Month? Check your local hospitals, food banks, community organizations and schools for special programs and educational classes taught by registered dietitians (RDs).

Can’t find any classes in your area? Try these simple ideas to jump start your healthy lifestyle:

- Explore new foods by cooking one new healthy dish for your family every week of March. Visit for nutritious recipes.

- Visit a farmer’s market and select a fruit or vegetable that is new to you. Find your local farmers market by visiting the San Diego Farm Bureau’s website.

- Learn how to read a food label by visiting the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website, and practice your new skills on your next grocery shopping trip.

- Be active! Commit to taking a walk in your neighborhood after dinner each night.

- Reduce your chances of getting sick by practicing proper food safety guidelines. Learn about them here.

Need a little boost to start your new healthy habits? Consult with a local registered dietitian to learn easy-to-follow nutrition advice and reduce your risk of chronic disease. If you know a dietitian, make sure to give them a shout-out on March 11th, because it is Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day! You can also learn more about dietitians at

Healthy snacks... yes, there is such a thing!

Nutrition Notes: Snacking with a purpose

by Edgar Calderon, Nutrition Intern

All parents understand that it is important to provide healthy snacks to children, but did you know most kids get over a quarter of their daily calories from snacking? A 2010 study reported that sixty percent of children skip a meal, typically breakfast. Often the caloric deficiency is made up through snacking. These recent studies and surveys have made it more clear how much of an impact snacking choices have on a child’s development. Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to get kids to make smart snacking choices when typically the decision process does not include the parents.

Below are a few tips that will help encourage kids to make smarter decisions when they visit the fridge and/or pantry.

Give kids what they love. Try to incorporate their favorite foods into their snack, even if this means cookies. A single crushed up cookie will go a long way in a healthy trail mix of nuts and dried fruit.

You can wrap everything. Try a savory hummus and shredded carrot wrap or if they are craving something sweet, get out their favorite nut butter and fruit. Your wrapping options are only confined to your creativity!

Make your own dips. Most store-bought dips can be unhealthy. Making your own can be easier than it sounds, and it gives you and your family the ability to customize to your specific tastes. Make an easy tasty dip for veggies using taco seasoning and low-fat plain yogurt.

Use simple recipes. Using simple recipes allows for (older) kids to be more involved in the food preparation process. Try new recipes with them or try to create a healthy spin on a family favorite. They will be proud of their recipes and be excited to share with friends.

Looking for a few fun new snack ideas? Check out a few of these resources for ideas:

Super Healthy Kid Snacks
The 20 Best Snacks for Kids
10 Snack Tips for Parents

Granola is a great snack, if you know how to do it the healthy way!

Nutrition Notes: How to become a DIY granola guru

Jenna Olson, RD and Nutrition & Wellness Educator

Granola is known as a breakfast favorite around the world. Some people view granola as a power-packed health food, while others think it is chalked full of unnecessary calories. Store-bought granola can be expensive, but the great news is you can make your own and it is usually less expensive!

Granola is a fun and super simple healthy option that can be prepared right at home! By making granola at home, the potential for mystery ingredients is removed, which makes it easier to forgo the possibly not-so healthy ingredient options. A basic granola recipe generally includes oats, sweetener, oil and some add-in options. Those options may include nuts, dried fruit, seeds or dried coconut shavings. Some recipes may even call for an extra protein punch from peanut butter or other nut butter such as almond butter. Since granola is packed with nutritionally dense ingredients, it is important to be conscious of portion sizes! The average serving size for granola is about 1/4 cup (about the size of one large egg) and ranges from 100-150 calories per serving depending on the ingredients chosen.

Granola recipe ideas are endless! Follow the steps below, and get creative in the kitchen with a recipe that suits your style and taste buds.

Main Ingredients

1. Grains: 3 cups
Most recipes include rolled oats but feel free to add in a couple tablespoons of quinoa for extra protein.

2. Nuts: 1-1 ½ cups
Choose a favorite nut or go for a mix some favorites include almonds, pistachios, walnuts or pecans.

3. Sweetener: 1/2 – 3/4 cup
A liquid sweetener helps bind the granola together by coating the mixture evenly. Try using maple syrup, honey, agave or brown rice syrup.

4. Oil: 1/4 – 1/2 cup
This is the crunch factor. The sweetener is in charge of binding whereas the oil keeps the granola from becoming one big sticky glob. Oils including olive oil, coconut oil, canola or grapeseed oil will do the trick.

5. Salt: Just a pinch
Salt always goes a long way so make sure to not over do it here!

Potential Add-In Ingredients

6. Seeds: 1-2 cups
These may include pumpkin, sunflower or sesame seeds

7. Dried coconut shavings or dried fruit: 1 cup

8. Spices: 1 teaspoon
Try adding sweet and savory spices to the recipe such as cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger.

Directions (How to mix and bake properly)

1. Turn oven on to 300˚F.

2. Place all dry ingredients into a large bowl. Do not add dried fruit or roasted nuts at this stage, if they are a part of the designed recipe.

3. Add oil and sweetener to the bowl of dry ingredients and stir all ingredients together.

4. Spray baking pan with non-stick spray and spread out granola mixture onto baking sheet.

5. Bake at 300 ˚F for 30-45 minutes; make sure to stir granola half way through after about 20 minutes in the oven.

6. Let granola cool completely and store in an airtight container.

Granola is a great addition to many staple snack and meal ideas. Check out a few of the links below for recipes and ideas on how to use it! Happy baking!

Granola: 14 Ways to Use It
Peanut Butter Oatmeal Energy Bites
3 Ingredient No Bake Granola Bars
Grab & Go Granola Bars and Bites

Photo from Serving & Sharing Foundation's website.

Serving & Sharing Foundation selected as February Agency of the Month!

by Shelly Hahne, Nonprofit Services Manager

The Serving & Sharing Foundation started distributing EFAP commodities packages last April, and have become a leading agency in a very short amount of time. When they initially contacted the Food Bank about running an EFAP site, there was a great need for food assistance in the Valley Center area. This group from Chula Vista decided if the need was there, they could meet it.

In the nine months since their program opened, more than 8,357 meals (the equivalent of 10,697 pounds of food) have been distributed to individuals and families in need by this dedicated group of staff and volunteers. They operate a monthly mass distribution that serves 76 households each month.

This group of volunteers has also stepped up to help other distribution sites in times of need. Just last month, they offered to help at First Christian Church of National City’s larger monthly distribution when the site’s regular lead volunteers were out on vacation. This is truly a committed group who is willing to do everything in their power to fight hunger across our community.

Congratulations to the Serving & Sharing Foundation for the amazing work you do!

Nutrition Notes: Vitamin D – The Sunshine Vitamin

by Nicole Hartig, Dietetic Intern

Vitamin D is a powerhouse of a vitamin, because it plays an important role in bone strength, our immunity, and cell growth. Adequate levels of vitamin D have also been shown to reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. On the other side, not getting enough vitamin D can cause a loss of bone mass, which can lead to osteoporosis. Getting enough vitamin D through all stages of life is important so that our bones and cells can grow and stay strong.

If vitamin D is so important, where do we get it? The sun! Vitamin D is known as the “Sunshine Vitamin” because our skin absorbs sunlight and turns it into vitamin D. In these cloudy winter months it can be difficult to get the recommended amount, not to mention that too much exposure to sunlight is damaging to our skin. Luckily, there are quite a few food sources that are packed with vitamin D to help increase intake. Only a few foods naturally contain vitamin D, but it is added to many products. Try fish (such as salmon and tuna), mushrooms, eggs, vitamin D fortified milk, orange juice or yogurt, to get your recommended dose of vitamin D.

Click here to read more information on recommended intake and good sources of vitamin D.

Make sure to get outside, and catch some rays, too! Enjoying the outdoors doesn’t require a lot of money. Check out this list of 25 FREE things to do in San Diego for a few ideas!

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