Nutrition Notes: Nutrition for Althletes

by Divya Denduluri (MS Nutritional Biology, CLEC), Nutrition Education Volunteer

We all need food as a source of nourishment to grow and stay healthy. Food also gives us energy to perform and play; and helps rebuild and repair injured tissue. So think about our Olympic Athletes. What do you think they’re eating? Nutritional needs can vary based on the type of sport being played and individual needs of athletes. Although you may not all be ready to make your Olympic debut, you can properly fuel for whatever exercise you choose to do!

Here are some tips to stay nourished while playing, as recommended by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Hydration: It is important to keep yourself hydrated while playing, especially in long duration sports like tennis and soccer.

Carbs: Eating carbs will help fuel your workout. If you’re partaking in sustained exercise over 1 hour like cycling or long-distance running, foods like bananas, high energy bars, gels and drinks rich in carbs are important to provide energy boosts during your exercise.

Electrolytes: Electrolytes may be lost with sweat during endurance sports and must be replenished along with fluids and carbs.

The International Olympic Committee’s 2010 Consensus Statement on Sports Nutrition recommends eating high carb foods before and after sports to store and replenish sufficient energy reserves, and that timely protein intake helps build muscle tissue. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends a nutrient-dense, well-balanced diet high in quality carbs (like whole grains, fruits and vegetables), moderate in healthy fats (like avocados, plant-based oils, nuts, tahini and fish), and adequate in protein (beans, lean meat, seafood, fish, tofu, milk, yogurt and cheese) for endurance training and racing. You can also find useful tips for nutrient needs to build and maintain muscle mass, and eating well before working out at eatright.org and usaswimming.org.

References:

1. http://www.eatright.org/resource/fitness/training-and-recovery/races-and-competitions/sports-dietitians-prep-athletes-for-olympics

2. http://www.eatright.org/resource/fitness/training-and-recovery/endurance-and-cardio/eat-right-for-endurance

3. http://www.usaswimming.org/ViewNewsArticle.aspx?TabId=0&Alias=Rainbow&Lang=en&ItemId=15777&mid=11780

Nutrition Notes: Coconut Oil – The Good, Bad and Ugly

by Divya Denduluri (MS Nutritional Biology, CLEC), Nutrition Education Volunteer

Recently, coconut oil has been hailed as a “wonder-oil” with many health benefits. It has been touted as a cure for eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, heart disease and gastrointestinal disorders, aiding weight loss, increasing immunity and fighting infections. Coconut oil contains about 44% lauric acid, which has been known to have some antiviral, antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. While it has been known to increase good cholesterol (HDL), it also increases bad cholesterol (LDL) levels.

Coconut oil has a sweet, nutty flavor and is obtained from the mature fruit of the coconut tree. Vegan diets use coconut oil instead of butter or shortening as it is solid at room temperature. It contains approximately 91% saturated fat. Higher consumption of saturated fats has been associated with increased risk of heart disease. Due to its high saturated fat content, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends consuming coconut oil in moderation. The American Heart Association recommends reducing saturated fat intake to about 5-6% of total daily caloric intake for persons who need to lower their cholesterol levels.

Moderate intake of saturated fat, less than 10% of the total daily calories – approximately 15 grams, is considered safe. To get an idea, there are about 10-12 grams of saturated fats in half a cup of ice-cream, 1.5 tablespoons of butter or 1 tablespoon of coconut oil.

It is a good idea to substitute some saturated fats in the diet with mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) as these fats can increase good cholesterol levels while decreasing bad cholesterol levels. Using a combination of MUFA (10-15% of total daily calories), PUFA (10% of total daily calories) and saturated fats – in moderation, is the current recommendation. Olive oil, avocados, sesame oil, canola oil, almonds, peanuts and hazelnuts are good sources of MUFA. PUFA-rich foods include sunflower oil, safflower oil, corn oil and soybean oil.

While coconut oil is not a nutrient superhero, it isn’t a nutrient “supervillain” either. Consuming it in reasonable amounts may be safe, but as of now, there is no scientific evidence showing its need as a supplement or super food. A good rule of thumb to follow, as with anything food-related, is to eat and enjoy foods in moderation!

References:
1. http://www.nutrition.org/asn-blog/2009/07/coconut-oil/
2. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11746-014-2562-7

Nutrition Notes: Feijoada – Black Beans the Brazilian Way

by Divya Denduluri (MS Nutritional Biology, CLEC), Nutrition Education Volunteer

The 2016 Olympic Games are about to begin in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. And we are celebrating too – with feijoada, which is considered Brazil’s national dish.

Feijoada is a delicious stew made with pork and black beans, served with rice and orange slices. This stew is traditionally served on Saturdays and is meant to be enjoyed at a leisurely pace with family and friends. Feijoada is slow-cooked for about 24 hours using pork (including ears, feet and tail) that add flavor to this dish. Here is an easy and tasty version of feijoada:

Recipe: Feijoada in a Jiffy

Preparation time: 40-50 minutes | Number of servings: 2-3

Ingredients:

- 1 can black beans
- 4 oz dry, cured chorizo
- ½ lb. pork or beef ribs
- 2 oz smoked bacon for flavor
- 1 cup chicken stock
- 1 onion, finely chopped
- ½ tsp ground cumin
- Salt and chili powder to taste
- 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
- 1 tbsp olive oil
- 1 tbsp vinegar

Directions:

1. Heat a pan and fry the bacon until it is crispy. Remove from pan.
2. Sear the ribs and chorizo with ½ tbsp. oil, and add salt and chili powder. Remove from pan.
3. Add ½ tbsp. oil to the pan and sauté onion and garlic until mixture is golden brown.
4. Add beans, stock, meat, cumin powder, salt and vinegar.
5. Cook for 20-30 minutes until the stew comes together.
6. Serve with rice and orange slices.

So how about giving this Brazilian chili a try?

References:
1. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Celebrate-Brazil-with-Emerils-Feijoada-180951699/?no-ist
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feijoada
3. http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/top-10-foods-try-brazil

Nutrition Notes: Blueberry Month

by Divya Denduluri (MS Nutritional Biology, CLEC), Nutrition Education Volunteer

Blueberries are one of our nutrition superheroes of July. These refreshingly juicy, sweet-tart purplish blue berries are full of vitamin C, folic acid, fiber, potassium and manganese.

Choose firm, smooth-skinned blueberries that are blue-purple in color and not green, without moisture, mold or bruises. Rinse the berries in cold water before eating. Stored berries in the refrigerator should be eaten within 3-7 days. You can enjoy blueberries throughout the year by freezing fresh blueberries. Did you know that blueberries are available fresh, frozen, infused-dried, freeze dried, powdered, and in liquid and puree forms?

Blueberries are yummy on their own, but may be enjoyed in a smoothie, with breakfast cereal, on top of some yogurt, in muffins, pancakes, scones, salads and preserves. Try adding some pureed blueberries to vinaigrette for a flavorful salad dressing. Also, you can try an easy and no added sugar recipe for making blueberry jam- just simply bake fresh berries at 400°F for 10 minutes (1).

What is your berry favorite way of enjoying blueberries?

References:

1. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/planning-and-prep/snack-and-meal-ideas/a-very-berry-summer

2. http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/healthy-living/blueberry-nutrition/

3. http://bit.ly/2adP2BX

Food from the Hunger Bags can be used to make delicious meals like this Tortilla Soup! Recipe below.

Wonder what meals families can make with Hunger Bags?

By Chef Dave Histed, Pavilion’s Executive Chef

As the Pavilion’s Executive Chef, I am constantly searching for great simple ingredients that a little kitchen alchemy can turn into a beautiful composed dish. The hunger bags present an amazing opportunity to a chef as they are the items that the Food Bank needs most, and also during a time when kids are out of school and no longer receiving the meal assistance that is offered during the school year. Our children are our future, and I strongly advocate involving your children or grandchildren in the kitchen. Simple, safe, and fun tasks such as shucking corn or starting an herb garden allow kids to get their hands dirty and learn about the importance of healthy, nutritious food in their lives. I invite you to try the recipe below, which focuses on the importance addressing of our communities’ direct needs and our ability to change the face of hunger.

Chef’s Tip: Tortilla soup is traditionally served with a number of garnishes allowing the diner to customize their eating experience! Choose produce that you can slice fresh to add a variety of textures and flavors. Crunchy radishes, crisp shredded cabbage, and vibrant herbs such as cilantro all make great additions to this soup. This is also a great way for kids to learn about and try different veggies!

Fun Fact: This tortilla soup recipe utilizes the whole kernel sweet corn from the Hunger Bags which is pureed into the soup base. This method allows the natural sweetness of the corn to enhance the soup, also lending beautiful supporting flavors to the corn tortillas which are the namesake of the dish.

RECIPE: QUICK AND EASY TORTILLA SOUP
Preparation time: 20 mins | Number of servings: 4

Ingredients:

- 2 Tablespoons Unsalted Butter
- 1 cup Tortilla Chips, crushed
- 2 “15 oz. cans” Signature Kitchens Tomato Sauce
- 2 “15 oz. cans” Signature Kitchens Diced Tomatoes
- 1 “15 oz. can” Signature Kitchens Whole Kernel Corn, drained and rinsed
- 1 cup or more as needed Chicken Stock or Vegetable Stock
- 2 teaspoons Cumin, ground
- 2 teaspoons Mexican Oregano, dried (if not available use standard oregano)
- As needed: Kosher Salt and ground Black Pepper

Optional Garnishes:

- 1 bunch Radishes, sliced
- 1 cup Signature Kitchens canned black beans, rinsed and drained
- 1 bunch Cilantro, washed, leaves only
- 1 cup Tortilla Chips, crushed
- 1 avocado Fresh Avocado, sliced

Customize to your preference! Seasonal vegetables of your choice: tomatoes, bell peppers, roasted summer squash, roasted corn, or shredded cabbage.

Instructions:

1. Heat a large soup pot over medium heat. Add butter and toast tortilla chips for until crispy and golden brown. Add all other soup ingredients and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes,
then remove from heat.

2. Prepare a blender by removing the middle insert of the cap (this will allow the steam to escape as the soup purees). Fill the blender to no more than half capacity with soup, place the
lid on the blender, and cover the hole in the lid with a folded kitchen towel. This process is vital to follow as the soup releases lots of steam when pureed and needs to be vented.

3. Puree all of the soup until a smooth consistency is reached, adding additional chicken or vegetable stock if you prefer a thinner soup. Serve with optional garnishes above and enjoy!

Nutrition Notes: Go Grilling!

by Divya Denduluri (MS Nutritional Biology, CLEC), Nutrition Education Volunteer

Summer is here! And with it comes the tradition of grilling and barbecuing. Grilling food involves cooking it at high temperatures for a short period of time. Grilled foods are tasty and flavorful without too much added fat as compared to frying.

Some tips for safe and healthy grilling, as recommended by www.eatright.org:

- Choose lean cuts of meat as fat from meat may burn the outside while leaving the inside under-cooked.

- Marinate the food adequately before grilling to add flavor.

- Make your own marinade by combining salty, sour and sweet tastes – like soy sauce, lemon juice and honey and add your favorite spices and herbs like crushed black pepper, garlic, ginger
and parsley.

- Tools like tongs, spatulas and platters are necessary to help grill food.

- Gas and charcoal grills are popular, though temperature control is easier in gas grills.

- Seafood, tofu, tempeh and veggies like corn, portabella mushrooms, peppers, sweet potatoes and carrots are also cool foods to grill.

- Meats should be cooked thoroughly to prevent food-borne illnesses. Click here for more info on cooking
temperature.

- Likewise, it is a safe practice to keep raw, cooked, hot and cold foods and the associated utensils all separate from each other.

- Avoid charring food, as charring produces substances in the food which may cause cancer.

Here’s wishing you a happy summer and safe grilling!

References:

1. http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/lifestyle/seasonal/get-grilling-pro-tips-for-summer

Nutrition Notes: Papaya Month

by Divya Denduluri (MS Nutritional Biology, CLEC), Nutrition Education Volunteer

Papayas are sweet, succulent with brightly colored flesh, reminding us of sunny beaches on tropical islands. These tropical beauties are rich in beta carotene, vitamin C, folate and potassium. Papayas are grown in Florida and Hawaii in the United States, and are in peak season during early summer and fall. While buying papayas, select ones that are firm to touch, the skin being partly or mostly yellow in color and without bruises. Papayas may be stored at room temperature for a few days until the skin turns completely yellow-orange, and the ripe fruit can be stored in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Fun Fact: Did you know that papayas contain the enzyme papain which is used to tenderize meat? Try a marinade of smashed or crushed papayas. Add them to a Ziploc bag with your uncooked meat and refrigerate before cooking!

Here are some additional ways to enjoy this delicious fruit:

- Chop up some papayas and add to salsa, salads or breakfast cereal for a sweet twist.
- Add them to smoothies.
- Purée some papaya in a blender and freeze in popsicle molds for some papaya popsicles.
- Dice them and enjoy as is with a squeeze of lemon juice or along with other fruits and relish a yummy fruit bowl.

References:

1. http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/papaya
2. http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/fruit-month-papaya
3. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/planning-and-prep/snack-and-meal-ideas/go-tropical-with-super-fruits

The FDA is debuting its new and improved Nutrition Facts Label!

Nutrition Notes: Nutrition Facts Makeover!

by Callie Brust (MPH, RDN, CHES), Nutrition & Wellness Educator

Over the last week or so, you may have heard about the update our Nutrition Facts Panel will be receiving. Can you believe that our current label is 20 years old?! The changes to our label reflect new scientific findings and will help consumers when choosing healthy food options.

Here’s a quick guide to the refreshed Nutrition Facts Panel:

1. Start with the Serving Size

Serving sizes must now be based on the amounts that people are actually eating, not what they should be eating. Always compare your portion to the serving size listed. Is it bigger? Smaller? If the serving size is one cup and you eat two, then you’ll get double of what’s listed on the label.

2. Check Out the Total Calories

This number is huge now! Can’t miss it. Whether you count calories or not, it’s always a good idea to be aware of how much energy your food is giving you.

3. Daily Values are Your Guide

The Percent Daily Value is based on 2,000 calories per day. You may eat more or less than that, but it’s a good general guide. If a nutrient has 5% or less % DV, then that’s considered low. If its 20% or higher, that’s considered high.

So if you have a healthy nutrient you want enough of, like Fiber, do you want that closer to 5% or 20%? Right, 20%!

If you have a nutrient you want to limit, like Saturated Fat, Sodium, or Added Sugar, do you want that closer to 5% or 20%? Exactly. 5%!

4. Additions to the Panel

Take a look under sugar on the new label, what do you see? Added sugar! We’ll now be able to track exactly how much added sugar we’re consuming. The recommendation is less than 10% of your total calories should come from added sugar. So for someone on a 2,000 calorie diet, that would be 50 grams or less. But overall less is best!

Vitamin D and Potassium are now required to be on our new label. These are nutrients that Americans don’t always get enough of.

The changes to our Nutrition Fact Panel will start to roll out soon and by July 2018, major manufactures will be required to use this format. So pay closer attention to the foods you’re buying. Can you spot any new labels?

Resources:
http://1.usa.gov/1obiyXp
http://bit.ly/1zK06Kz

It's National Dairy Month!

Nutrition Notes: National Dairy Month

by Divya Denduluri (MS Nutritional Biology, CLEC), Nutrition Education Volunteer

June is National Dairy Month. Dairy includes milk and its products like yogurt, cheese, cream and sour cream. Milk, yogurt and cheese are excellent sources of calcium, protein, riboflavin, vitamins A, B12 and D, phosphorus, potassium and magnesium. Try choosing unsweetened and low-fat, skim, part-skim or fat-free milk, yogurt, cheese, cream cheese and sour cream to reduce the amount of sugar and fat we eat. Also, buy cheese with lower sodium content. Lactose-free milk and reduced-lactose milk is widely available for those who are sensitive to lactose.

Click here to learn how to store dairy safely.

A fruit and yogurt parfait is a perfect and easy way to celebrate National Dairy Month, don’t you think?

_________________________________________________________________________

Recipe: Peachy Parfait

Preparation time: 10 minutes
Number of servings: 1

Ingredients:

- ½ cup peaches or your favorite fruit – washed, pitted and diced
- ½ cup low-fat plain Greek yogurt
- 2 to 3 mejdool dates – pitted, soaked in warm water and puréed
- 1 tbsp toasted nuts or granola
- A pinch of cinnamon powder (optional)

Directions:

1. Toss the cinnamon powder with the peaches.
2. Mix the date puree with the Greek yogurt.
3. To serve, start with a layer of yogurt in a serving bowl.
4. Next, add a layer of peaches and nuts or granola.
5. Repeat this to get 2 layers each of yogurt, fruit and nuts/granola.

References:

1. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/dietary- guidelines-and-myplate/dont-forget-the-dairy

CalFresh can help struggling families fill their empty plates.

Debunking Harmful Myths About a Powerful Program

by San Diego Hunger Coalition

It may surprise you to learn that San Diego has one of the most effective solutions to hunger at our fingertips. It’s called CalFresh, a program that is designed to uplift families by ensuring people receive the sustenance they need, enabling them to focus on working toward self-sufficiency. That’s a big deal.

But thousands of families in San Diego County who are eligible for CalFresh don’t use the program. Why? There are a few reasons, but a major cause is that decades ago, CalFresh was called “food stamps.” These two words conjure up a storm of stigma, stereotypes and misinformation powerful enough to keep families struggling with hunger from applying for this food assistance.

While the connotations of food stamps have always been based in myth, today they are further from the truth than ever. The reality is that after decades of improvements and technology upgrades to the program, CalFresh has become one of the most effective, wide-reaching strategies we have for bringing food to the plates of people who don’t have enough to eat.

We invite you to learn these facts about CalFresh and share them with your friends and family. If we remove the harmful stigma of CalFresh and build awareness of its benefits, we will be one step closer to ensuring no one in San Diego has to go to bed hungry.

What exactly is CalFresh?

CalFresh is simply a monthly supplement to a household’s food budget. On average, the program offers $4.38 per person, per day disbursed to a debit card (called an EBT card) that can be used to purchase a limited category of food products (no tobacco, alcohol, toiletries or hot foods). Households with incomes at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty line should apply to see if they qualify for the program.

CalFresh is the California name for the federally funded program called SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) at the national level. It is the more advanced, modern and effective iteration of “food stamps.”

Does it work?

Like a charm. On average, households in San Diego County enroll in CalFresh for just under two years before moving towards food security. CalFresh changes lives – just ask Jim.

What’s the problem?
Only an estimated 67 percent of eligible, food-insecure people in San Diego County are enrolled in CalFresh. Enrollment rates are low because of barriers like social stigma, lengthy application processes and lack of awareness.

To fix this, San Diego Hunger Coalition leads the CalFresh Task Force, a group of over 50 organizations including the San Diego Food Bank and others, working together to improve our CalFresh enrollment systems. By leading research, education and advocacy efforts among a wide range of hunger relief partners in San Diego, the Hunger Coalition builds a more effective and interconnected system of food assistance resources to help families access the food they need.

What are some myths about CalFresh I can help debunk?

Myth: CalFresh has high rates of fraud.

Fact: CalFresh has one of the most rigorous quality control systems and the lowest fraud rates of any public benefit program, less than 2%.

Myth: Applying for CalFresh can impact my immigration status.

Fact: Applying for CalFresh does not affect your immigration status or your application for citizenship in any way. Legal permanent residents are eligible for CalFresh immediately in California, and receiving benefits will not hurt your chances of becoming a citizen. Similarly, if you are an undocumented immigrant and apply for CalFresh on behalf of your citizen children, your immigration status will not be shared with authorities. Confidentiality is strictly enforced at all CalFresh offices.

How can I make a difference?

Share the facts with your friends and family on Facebook and Twitter. If you think a friend or neighbor may qualify for CalFresh, tell them that many community-based organizations like San Diego Food Bank are able to help them through the enrollment process. Click here for more information on these agencies.

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